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Ericka. 25. North Carolina. College Graduate. English and Creative Writing Major. Book Junkie-Hoarder-Collector-Lover-Worshipper. Prowler of Secondhand Shops. Maker of Pizzas. This is a Secondary Blog. So, chances are I'm following you on my primary and you'll never notice.

There's no such thing as too many books, and my library will never be complete.

My Library

My Wishlist

My Goodreads Account

My Primary Blog

absinthias-agitations said: What are your favorite books?

My favorite book of all time is Geek Love by Katherine Dunn. My favorite series is Harry Potter. My favorite childhood book is The Devil’s Arithmetic by Jane Yolen. My favorite book I’ve read this year is Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell.
Thanks for asking!

What are some of everyone else’s favorite books?

books-and-bands-and-such said: What author do you think has the best writing style?

This one is tricky! I’ve read many beautiful, well-written things with powerful quotes and striking imagery. The author that reaches me the best is Chuck Palahniuk. His voice is very recognizable without being stale, and his writing packs a punch. He makes me happy and sad and sometimes very uncomfortable—it keeps things interesting. Thank you for asking :)

Ask me some bookish questions or put a recommendation in my ask? I just want to talk about books.

bookmad:

petition for c-parks to read the harry potter series.

I’ll sign this petition.

Here are my hauls from the library book sale. The ones lined up on the left are from today, the stack is from Saturday. And I realized I made a typo earlier: I got 26 books for $29.50, not 36. But still, good haul.

Here are my hauls from the library book sale. The ones lined up on the left are from today, the stack is from Saturday. And I realized I made a typo earlier: I got 26 books for $29.50, not 36. But still, good haul.

mychemicalbooks:

My sister said that if this got 10,000 notes, she would read Harry Potter, which she has refused to read ever since she existed. This series is everything, and her 12 year old mind shouldn’t live without it. Please help me out, I really want to see her fall in love with HP the way we all did!

Signal boost like crazy, guys. If something I tapped into my phone while half-asleep one morning is still getting notes, we can get mychemicalbooks her 10k so she can convince her sister to read this wonderful series! And if you can’t do it for Potter (for whatever reason), then do it to support young adults reading more!

memyselfandwhyworld:

Rules: In a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard — they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you. Tag [ten] friends, including me, so I’ll see your list. Make sure you let…

I was tagged by memyselfandwhyworld! Thank you for including me, sorry it took so long to get around to, I’ve had a lot of things going on and wanted to do this on my PC instead of my iPhone.

My books are in no particular order, except that the first one is my absolute favorite.

1. Geek Love by Katherine Dunn

2. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

3. It by Stephen King

4. The Reapers are the Angels by Alden Bell

5. Invisible Monsters by Chuck Palahniuk

6. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

7. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

8. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

9. The Devil’s Arithmetic by Jane Yolen

10. The Harry Potter Series by J. K. Rowling 

I tag anyone who would like to do this, and feel free to tag me back so I can look at your lists =)

bookhauler:

had a little time before work, so… also, my walls aren’t as photogenic as the rest of yours and my phone quality sucks I’m sorry

*flails*
ILOVETHIS

thewritingcafe:

A lot of people are trying to write more diverse worlds, but a lot of people are also perfectionists who need to know every detail and reason in their world. Here are some ways and explanations for creating a diverse world. This is geared toward pre-industrial and early industrial societies.
Trade: Trade can do wonders. Trade is how your characters get rare fabrics, different foods, knowledge of other cultures, knowledge of other languages, cultural diffusion, and more. Trade can occur over land or over water. You can get characters to travel halfway around the world. You can have trade posts near major cities. Groups of traders who travel over land can go through cities, towns, and tiny villages. Entire cultures can be centered around trade and they can have influence on many parts of your world.
Exile: This can make for some interesting stories for characters. Using exile can put entire families or even whole groups of people (ethnic groups, religious groups, a village, etc.) in faraway lands where they’ll probably stay for a long time. Means of exile can vary. They might have been banished from their land or a natural disaster could have forced them to move.
Hiding: Like exile, you can uproot characters and place them in another place while also coming up with an interesting back story for why they are hiding. This can also reveal a bit about your world. If there are several people in hiding from one particular place, what does that say about the relationship between these two places or these places themselves (i.e., corruptness, law, freedom, etc.)?
Politics: Political rulers are not confined to their homes. They can travel to other nations for political or personal reasons. They might need to discuss political matters with another ruler or they might be guests at a party. There are also political marriages or children of political leaders who live elsewhere as a ward.
War: War, past or present, can bring people to your setting. Some people might be refugees, some might be descendants of prisoners of war, and some might be allies. Or, a past war could have acquired more land and the people who were there, making them citizens of the new nation post-war (depending on the rules of citizenship). Whether they’re citizens or not, they’re still in the same nation and it’s likely some will travel to major cities or elsewhere within the nation’s borders. There can also be forts and camps for a military of another nation.
Education: Does your setting have some type of prestigious school? If schools are few, ones like these can attract the rich, powerful, and/or connected from several surrounding areas. Even if there are several schools a prestigious one can still attract many people.
Religion: Some religions have a goal of spreading their beliefs, so you can bring that into your world. Other times, if there is something of religious significance in your setting, religious people may travel there on a regular basis. Those who spread religion might travel on similar routes of traders (or they might be the traders) to talk about their religion. Or there might be places where religious leaders gather and live.
Exploration: You can get some explorers, or even just wandering travelers, to go to faraway places in search of resources, people, enlightenment, religion, important objects, and more. Another option would be researchers.
Festivals and Ceremonies: These can be tied to religion, history, politics, and many other things. Large celebrations can bring tons of people to one place, whether it’s in a city or not. If you’ve got something like this in your story, take advantage of it to introduce new people and cultures.

thewritingcafe:

A lot of people are trying to write more diverse worlds, but a lot of people are also perfectionists who need to know every detail and reason in their world. Here are some ways and explanations for creating a diverse world. This is geared toward pre-industrial and early industrial societies.

Trade: Trade can do wonders. Trade is how your characters get rare fabrics, different foods, knowledge of other cultures, knowledge of other languages, cultural diffusion, and more. Trade can occur over land or over water. You can get characters to travel halfway around the world. You can have trade posts near major cities. Groups of traders who travel over land can go through cities, towns, and tiny villages. Entire cultures can be centered around trade and they can have influence on many parts of your world.

Exile: This can make for some interesting stories for characters. Using exile can put entire families or even whole groups of people (ethnic groups, religious groups, a village, etc.) in faraway lands where they’ll probably stay for a long time. Means of exile can vary. They might have been banished from their land or a natural disaster could have forced them to move.

Hiding: Like exile, you can uproot characters and place them in another place while also coming up with an interesting back story for why they are hiding. This can also reveal a bit about your world. If there are several people in hiding from one particular place, what does that say about the relationship between these two places or these places themselves (i.e., corruptness, law, freedom, etc.)?

Politics: Political rulers are not confined to their homes. They can travel to other nations for political or personal reasons. They might need to discuss political matters with another ruler or they might be guests at a party. There are also political marriages or children of political leaders who live elsewhere as a ward.

War: War, past or present, can bring people to your setting. Some people might be refugees, some might be descendants of prisoners of war, and some might be allies. Or, a past war could have acquired more land and the people who were there, making them citizens of the new nation post-war (depending on the rules of citizenship). Whether they’re citizens or not, they’re still in the same nation and it’s likely some will travel to major cities or elsewhere within the nation’s borders. There can also be forts and camps for a military of another nation.

Education: Does your setting have some type of prestigious school? If schools are few, ones like these can attract the rich, powerful, and/or connected from several surrounding areas. Even if there are several schools a prestigious one can still attract many people.

Religion: Some religions have a goal of spreading their beliefs, so you can bring that into your world. Other times, if there is something of religious significance in your setting, religious people may travel there on a regular basis. Those who spread religion might travel on similar routes of traders (or they might be the traders) to talk about their religion. Or there might be places where religious leaders gather and live.

Exploration: You can get some explorers, or even just wandering travelers, to go to faraway places in search of resources, people, enlightenment, religion, important objects, and more. Another option would be researchers.

Festivals and Ceremonies: These can be tied to religion, history, politics, and many other things. Large celebrations can bring tons of people to one place, whether it’s in a city or not. If you’ve got something like this in your story, take advantage of it to introduce new people and cultures.